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Why Fashion Illustration Matters in the Digital Age

Vogue Italia is starting 2020 off with a bang. For the first time in its 55-year history, the magazine has an illustrated cover (there are seven variants by different artists). The features, too, are all photography-free. This decision was motivated by more than aesthetics; sustainability and philanthropy are also part of the equation. As editor in chief Emanuele Farneti wrote in all caps on his Instagram, “No photo shoot production was required in the making of this issue.” The money saved in the process will be donated to the restoration of the flood-damaged Fondazione Querini Stampalia in Venice. “We cannot save the world,” Farneti said in a phone conversation, but this donation ensures that “something specific remains of this issue”—which is sure to...

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What Made Fashion Illustration Relevant Again?

René Bouët-Willaumez. US Vogue Front Cover. March 1 1937. BY ALICE NEWBOLD 15 SEPTEMBER 2018 From the digitalisation of fashion, to the authenticity of the genre, London's leading illustration gallery curator, Connie Gray, gives Vogue the lowdown. Illustration is becoming more relevant, recognised and accepted as a way of interpreting fashion,” Connie Gray, fashion curator at Gray M.C.A, tells Vogue. “People have a greater understanding and appreciation of it as an art genre that runs alongside photography.” Why? For a long time, it was considered too commercial to be classed as fine art. “But that doesn’t make it lesser,” Gray argues. “Most successful illustrators are highly trained in portraiture, technical drawing and fashion design – it’s an entirety of all the...

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Artist Ignasi Monreal On #GucciHallucination And Why Alessandro Michele Is A Modern Medici

Spanish painter Ignasi Monreal is seeing double Gs everywhere. The artist has spent the last few years working alongside Alessandro Michele to create public and digital advertising campaigns for Gucci that feature runway clothes depicted in Renaissance-style portraiture. “For the spring/summer 2018 images, I was working for several months straight, 14 hours a day with no free weekends,” Monreal explains. “So by the end of it I was literally having Gucci hallucinations.” Those aberrations gave way to his latest project with the Italian fashion house: a numbered, limited-edition capsule of 200 T-shirts and 100 sweatshirts printed with Monreal’s artwork from that same spring/summer 2018 campaign inspired by Greek and Roman mythology. It is aptly titled #GucciHallucination. The collection officially launched this week, and Monreal...

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GILL BUTTON IS THE ARTIST ILLUSTRATING GUCCI AND DRIES VAN NOTEN

Gill Button is a UK-based illustrator, who you might know as @buttonfruit from Instagram. Gill has a very unique and distinctive style, illustrating in a playful and painterly hand that makes high fashion feel real and accessible. Working mostly with oil paint, you can see the beauty in the brushstroke in Gill’s work, the texture, the movement and the emotion. This refreshing, contemporary approach has allowed her to work with clients such as Gucci and Dries Van Noten. Ahead of the Fashion Illustration Gallery’s upcoming Art Fair, we had a chance to talk to Gill about finding inspiration in London, and the sensuality of painting. Hi Gill, you have a distinctively unique style, how would you describe it to us and what are your...

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Richard Haines On Sketching The Catwalk

   Felicity Carter  Richard Haines is the jet setting figurative sketcher who beautifully captures catwalk and haute couture looks from the leading fashion houses. He refers to New York City as an endless runway, the city he moved to, to pursue illustration and it seems that the big apple hasn't let him down. He was a successful fashion designer, working at the likes of J Crew, Calvin Klein, and Perry Ellis, before returning to the life of a fashion illustrator. Each fashion house presented an opportunity for him to develop his illustration skills, making him one of the most in-demand artists on this field. Felicity Carter: What was your first memory of art? Richard Haines: My first memory was drawing at...

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